and the heart are especially vulnerable to the damaging effects of high blood pressure. There is a genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. For example 袁隆平宣布成果 薛之谦怒摔话筒

Health Hypertension is persistent high blood pressure. It affects nearly one quarter of American adults and more than half of people over 65. Most cases are essential hypertension, in which the cause is unknown. Left untreated, the excessive pressure of blood on the arteries eventually scars and narrows them, reducing their elasticity. This is increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis, because fatty plaque accumulates where arteries are damaged. The heart force to work much harder pumping blood through the narrowed arteries, becomes enlarged and inefficient. Eventually the heart is unable to supply enough nutrients and oxygen to organ and tissues. The kidneys, the brain, and the heart are especially vulnerable to the damaging effects of high blood pressure. There is a genetic predisposition to essential hypertension. For example, African Americans are more likely to develop hypertension and at an earlier age than Caucasians. If both parents have high blood pressure, then the probability their children also will have it rises dramatically. But does diet also play a role? Could changing our diets prevent or delay high blood pressure? And for people who have hypertension, can changing their diet help control their blood pressure? Excessive sodium can hold excessive fluid in body, at least temporarily. These excesses can be burdensome on the kidneys, heart, and blood vessels. The consensus among heart disease expert is that too much sodium, ingested routinely over the years, plays a role in the underlying causes of hypertension in genetically predisposed or salt-sensitive people. The more salt they eat, the higher their blood pressure. Hypertension is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, kidney disease, and stroke. Excess sodium intake raises blood pressure in those who are salt-sensitive. Inadequate levels of potassium, calcium, and possibly magnesium may also contribute to hypertension. Limiting sodium intake, along with eating lots of low-sodium vegetables, fruits, and low-fat daily products, will probably help reduce hypertension and its side effects. About the Author: 相关的主题文章:

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